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Beitragstitel Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair and Effects on Return to Work: Level of Employment, Change of Tasks, and Work Loss
Beitragscode P04
Autoren
  1. Pietro Feltri Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland Vortragender
  2. Andrea Stefano Monteleone Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
  3. Francesco Marbach Service of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Department of Surgery, EOC, Lugano, Switzerland
  4. Giuseppe Filardo Ente Ospdealiero Cantonale EOC
  5. Christian Candrian Ente Ospdealiero Cantonale EOC
Präsentationsform Poster
Themengebiete
  • A01 - Schulter/Ellbogen
Abstract Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine the return to previous work after an arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR), with a minimum of 12 months follow-up.

Methods: Three hundred and eighty-three patients underwent ARCR and were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were stratified based on the physical demand of their work according to the Canadian Classification and Dictionary of Occupations. The primary outcomes were time to return to work, level of employment, change of tasks, and work loss. Secondary outcomes including the return to sports activities, EQ-VAS, EQ-5D-5L, DASH, and Oxford score were also recorded.

Results: Overall, 86.4% of patients (n=331) returned to work at a mean time of 5.3 ± 4.5 months; of them, 6.4% had to lower their level of employment, and 5.5% changed their tasks. 13.6% of the patients lost their work, with a percentage of 34.4% in the heavy-work category. 75.3% returned to their previous level of sport activity. The mean EQ-VAS was 77.3 ± 18 points, the mean Oxford Shoulder score was 43.4 ± 7.2 points, and the DASH Score was 9.9 ± 14.5 points.

Conclusion: Patients undergoing ARCR may expect a high likelihood of return to work, but this could be jeopardized by the necessity of reducing their level of employment or changing their tasks. However, this is not true for patients with very physically demanding work, who have a percentage of job loss superior to 30%, and even if returning to work, they often have to reduce their level of employment or change their tasks.