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Beitragstitel 3D planned surgery of acute fractures performed with 3D guides planned and printed at the point of care – a feasibility study
Beitragscode P69
Autoren
  1. Andreas Hecker Inselspital Bern Vortragender
  2. Sophie C. Eberlein Universitätsspital Bern, Inselspital
  3. Frank Michael Klenke Gelenkzentrum Bern
Präsentationsform Poster
Themengebiete
  • A08 - Grundlagenforschung
Abstract Background
The surgical treatment of long bone fractures leads to complications due to insufficient accuracy in a relevant number of cases. In comminuted diaphyseal femur fractures relevant (>15°) rotation errors occur in up to 40%, which either results in a poor clinical outcome or requires revision surgery. The aim of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of surgery performed with 3D guides planned and printed at the point of care.
Methods
Ten porcine legs were used. CT imaging was performed and 3D models of femur and tibia were built. Reposition guides were constructed and virtually fitted to the proximal and distal metaphysis using Matetrialise Mimics software. Subsequently, these guides were 3D printed using medically approved resin on a Formlabs Form3B 3D printer. Comminuted fractures were created in the shaft region of femur and tibia and subsequently reduced using the 3D guides. Postoperatively, CT scans were acquired and 3D models were built to compare the achieved result to the preoperative planning. Deviations from the plan are given in millimeters (length) and degrees (rotation, axis).
Results
Femoral reposition showed a mean deviation from the plan of 0.8 mm for length, 1.0° for varus/valgus, 1.8° for flexion/extension and 2.7° for rotation. The tibial reposition showed a mean deviation from the plan of 2.5 mm for length, 1.4° for varus/valgus, 1.0° for flexion/extension and 1.6° for rotation.
Conclusion
This study shows a high accuracy of reposition with 3D guides planned and printed at the point of care. Applied to patients this technique has the potential to avoid malreduction and consecutive revision surgery in comminuted long-bone fractures in up to 40%.